80% by 2018

Virginia Cooperative Extension Joins Initiative to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screenings to 80% by 2018

80% by 2018 is a movement in which hundreds of organizations have committed to eliminating colorectal cancer as a major public health problem and are working toward the shared goal of reaching 80% screened for colorectal cancer by 2018.

Virginia Cooperative Extension is in an ideal position to be a key player in this effort.

Extension will work in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Virginia to implement “The Colorectal Cancer Free Zone” throughout every unit within Virginia Cooperative Extension. The unique positioning of Extension will not only allow for the internal promotion of a colorectal cancer free workforce, but will help expand the reach of the program to at least 586,600 Virginians that need to be screened for Virginia to reach the desired 80% screening rate.

The Facts:

  • Colorectal cancer is preventable.
  • Colorectal cancer is detectable.
  • Colorectal cancer is treatable.
  • Colorectal cancer is beatable.

Colorectal cancer is the second deadliest cancer in United States1 and impacts communities throughout Virginia. Colorectal cancer usually begins as a non-cancerous polyp on the inner lining of the colon, some polyps become cancerous while others do not.2 Screening may help detect and remove polyps before they become cancerous. Although screening is an effective means of removing precancerous polyps, nearly 1 in 3 Americans meeting screening recommendation guidelines do not utilize these services.3 In addition to screening, lifestyle modifications such as increased physical activity and improved dietary habits may help prevent colorectal cancer from developing.4

Increased screening rates and lifestyle modifications are essential to reducing the public health burden of colorectal cancer. Virginia Cooperative Extension is in an ideal position to be a key player in this effort. To this end, Extension has recently pledged to join more than 750 national organizations in an initiative to increase colorectal cancer screening rates to 80% by 2018.

1 ACS Cancer Statistics Center

2 ACS, How Does Colorectal Cancer Start

3 NCCRT, 80% by 2018 Resource Packet

4 ACS, Colorectal Cancer Risk Factors

  • All VCE employees will know how colorectal cancer screening saves lives.
  • All VCE employees will know what screening options are available, and the screening guidelines.
  • By June 2018, VCE will have an 80% screening rate among employees between the ages of 50 and 74 years.
  • All VCE employees will know what the lifestyle recommendations are for reducing colorectal cancer risk.  An environment of health will be promoted in VCE employees throughout the Commonwealth.

Five Myths About Colorectal Cancer:  

Myth: Colorectal cancer is a man’s disease.

Truth: Colorectal cancer is almost as common among women as men. Each year in the U.S., about 71,000 men and 64,000 women are diagnosed with colorectal cancer.


Myth: Colorectal cancer cannot be prevented.

Truth: In many cases, colorectal cancer can be prevented. Colorectal cancer almost always starts with a small growth called a polyp. If the polyp is found early, it can be removed – stopping colorectal cancer before it starts.


Myth: Age doesn’t matter when it comes to getting colorectal cancer.

Truth: Most colorectal cancers are found in people age 50 and older. For this reason, the American Cancer Society recommends that people at average risk start getting checked for this cancer when they’re 50.


Myth: It’s better not to get tested for colorectal cancer because it’s deadly anyway.

Truth: Colorectal cancer is often highly treatable. If it’s found and treated early (while it’s small and before it has spread), the 5-year relative survival rate is about 90%. But because many people are not getting tested the way they should, only about 4 out of 10 are diagnosed at this early stage when treatment is most likely to be successful.

Source: American Cancer Society

  • Colon cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. yet it can be prevented or detected at an early stage.
  • There are several screening options available to detect colorectal cancer, including simple take-home options. Talk to your doctor about getting screened.
  • Preventing colon cancer or finding it early doesn’t have to be expensive. There are simple, affordable tests available. Get Screened! Call your doctor today.
  • Most health insurance plans cover lifesaving preventive tests. Use the benefits you are paying for to get screened for colon cancer. Call your doctor today.

Source: National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable

The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) released the final 2016 recommendations for colorectal cancer screening. One of the primary differences from the 2008 recommendation is the addition of computed tomography (CT) colonography and multitargeted stool DNA (FIT-DNA) to the list of screening strategies.

80% by 2018 reaches 1000 pledges. The National Colorectal Cancer Round Table 80% by 2018 initiative reached an important milestone when the 1000th organization signed the 80% by 2018 pledge.

Virginia Cooperative Extension works to increase colorectal cancer screening rates

      • Jackie Tull
      • Jackie Tull, 4-H Youth Development, Accomack County Cooperative Extension

        “I would like to tell my experience with colon cancer to encourage people who have digestive issues to get it checked out by a doctor. I was having problems with weight loss and digestive issues for about eight months and had lost 25 pounds in that time. My gastroenterologist suggested I have a colonoscopy since it had been 8 years since my first one. During the procedure he found a polyp growing in the wall of my intestines and suggested I have it removed. I underwent surgery at which time they removed a foot of my intestines and it was cancer. I finished chemo in February, 2016 and so far all of my follow up test have come back clear. I was in the lucky 41% of cases that were found early and I was 49 years old at the time. The doctor told me that a key sign of colon cancer is unexplained weight loss. My message is that if you are having digestive symptoms and unexplained weight loss, go see your doctor.”

      • Leslie Fain
      • Leslie Fain, FCS Extension Agent, James City County

        “My family history is high with cancers, my mother passed at age 48 with melanoma, ignoring the change of a mole on her arm. My father had colon cancer at age 58 and died from both colon and esophageal cancer at age 60. My first scare was at age 36 when I experienced bleeding and had my first colonoscopy and discovered I had premalignant polyps. My colonoscopies have been at first every year, then every 3 years as there were no issues or signs, and next every 5 years. I am due again now, and will be scheduling the procedure. My gastroenterologist now wants my grown daughters at age 30 to begin their screenings as well. Please know your family’s history of cancer, and talk to your doctor about when you and your family members should start being screened for colon cancer.”

80% by 2018 Emblem

Upcoming Webinars

Stay tuned for more webinars in 2017.

Past Webinars

Get moving to reduce your colorectal cancer risk
Date: Tuesday, August 2
Time: 12:00 pm EDT

Play recording

Have your cake and eat it too: Decreasing your colorectal cancer risk through smart food choices
Tuesday, July 5, 2016 
12:55 pm | Eastern Daylight Time (New York, GMT-04:00)

Play recording

Colorectal Cancer: What is it, and how do I get screened?
Presenters:
Dr. Farrel Adkins, Specialist in colorectal surgery, Carilion Healthcare
Dr. John Michos, Medical Director, Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield

Play recording (1 hr 6 min)

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Contact

Carlin Rafie
Adult Nutrition Specialist
crafie@vt.edu